Flow Tips Newsletter

Standard or Custom Object? – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

Recently, I posted polls on Twitter asking about standard objects: What cloud license does each standard object come with? The answers to these questions are widely unknown. You will see that only about half of the respondents got the answer right.

As a response to these posts Emily McCowan, an Architect, posted this writeup and clarified some of the confusion around this topic. Please read it, it is very good.

You may know the data model very well. You will also need to know what standard objects come with your license to decide whether to use them when the need arises.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 07/08/2022.

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Flow Tips Newsletter

The Importance of the Data Model – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

I wrote this several times before:

If you want to attempt Actions and Related Records flows, you need to know the schema very well. This can be easily done with the schema builder in your Org.

There is another good way for reviewing the data model. The Architect’s site by Salesforce has the data model diagram posted for the most popular Clouds. You can go there and view and download the diagrams in pdf, png and Lucidchart format:

Click here for the Architect’s Site by Salesforce.

You can see the Sales Cloud example image from the Architect’s site above. Please click on the image to see a bigger version.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 06/27/2022.

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I Wrote For Salesforce This Week – Process Automation – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

I wrote for the Salesforce Admins Blog this week.

What is Process Automation?

How do you acquire this crucial skill?

Read my Process Automation blog post on the Salesforce Admins website by clicking here.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 06/23/2022.

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Flow Tips Newsletter

Which Object Do You Trigger On? – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

Suppose you know you need a record-triggered flow: You want to perform automated steps based on the transactions executing in your Salesforce Org.

If you deal with related records, you know you will be in the after-save mode (a.k.a. Actions and Related Records).

If you have come this far, this means you have already found answers to two essential questions:

  1. What type of flow do I need?
  2. If it is a record-triggered flow, will it be before-save or after-save?

You know that I answer a lot of flow questions on a regular basis. My observation is that folks often struggle with the next critical step:

Which object will I be triggering on?

Based on the previous decisions, we know you are already dealing with at least two objects. However, suppose a junction object is involved, like an Opportunity Contact Role that connects the Opportunity to Contacts or an Opportunity Line Item that connects the Opportunity to the Products. In that case, you may have three or more objects involved.

This is the part where things get confusing:

Which object will I trigger on, and what object(s) will I create/update?

The answer is surprisingly simple when you fill in the blanks in this format:

I want to create/update __ Object records when __ Object records are created/updated.

What you write in the second blank will show you what object you are triggering on.

Once you know that, you will need to go from one Object to the other using the relationships. Depending on the depth and the structure, you may use multiple gets.

I thought I’d step back from technical posts for now and focus on the fundamentals again.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 06/15/2022.

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Flow Tips Newsletter

The Answer for the Collection Filter & Collection Sort Challenge – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

Last week I told you that I challenged myself to use as few elements as possible when searching for particular records among the cases in my Org. You can find the Collection Filter and Collection Sort post here.

I started with a get element that returns all the cases that have both account and contact assignments. I was able to extract the following information with only one get element:

  • Most Recently Modified Case
  • Oldest Modified Case
  • Oldest Modified Case Account Name
  • Number of Cases by this Account
  • Most Recently Closed Date for this Account
  • Contact Id on this Case
  • Number of Cases for this Contact
  • Oldest Closed Date for this Contact on this Case

It took me 21 elements, including one get, to find all these records. How did I achieve this? Check the image above for the details. Click on the image to see a bigger version.

Enjoy.

Andy Engin Utkan

P.S. If you like this newsletter, forward it to your friends. They can sign up for it here.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 06/07/2022.

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Flow Tips Newsletter

Collection Filter and Collection Sort Challenge – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

How powerful are the collection sort and collection filter elements? How should you use them?

I experimented with collection filter and collection sort elements to see how far I can go using only one get element. In other words, I wanted my flow only to use up one SOQL against the governor limits.

I started with a get element that returns all the cases that have both account and contact assignments. I was able to extract the following information with only one get element:

  • Most Recently Modified Case
  • Oldest Modified Case
  • Oldest Modified Case Account Name
  • Number of Cases by this Account
  • Most Recently Closed Date for this Account
  • Contact Id on this Case
  • Number of Cases for this Contact
  • Oldest Closed Date for this Contact on this Case

Please see the image for the results.

How many elements did I use? Did I have to loop?

Here are the answers:

  • Your get element gives you sorting functionality. Use it.
  • You have to loop to get the min and max values, such as the oldest and most recent, sorted by Date and Time. But you need to loop only for one iteration. So you can exit after you assign the first record to a variable.
  • Your loop can use the existing sort or the reverse sort. Use this functionality.
  • Initially, I used a counter variable to exit the loop, but this was unnecessary. You need to exit the loop regardless after the first iteration. Insert a decision and connect both branches to the next element outside the loop.
  • You can get a count of records by using an assignment element with the operator “equals count”.

I experimented with the formula criteria inside the collection filter element without much luck. I think this functionality does not allow for filters with variable values on the right side of the equation. “ContactId on the current record = ContactIdVariable” formula did not work.

What do you think? Can these elements save you lengthy loops and executed elements?

How many elements, excluding the start or the end element, did I use to extract this information.

Join the discussion on LinkedIn here or Twitter here.

Live session recording links:

Watch Melody Lwo of Salesforce Flowsome and me either on LinkedIn here or YouTube here.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 05/30/2022.

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Flow Tips Newsletter

Post to Slack from Flow in 6 Easy Steps – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

This is an exciting week for all of us. The Release Readiness live webinars are here.

I was reading the Release Notes for Summer 22 this past weekend and I was wondering whether I can use the brand new Slack invocable actions in my Salesforce flows already. Salesforce announced the new actions are in beta, and they will be released sometime in June. It turns out I can already use them. I don’t even need a Preview Org or Summer 22 Sandbox for it. The steps required took some time to discover, but the whole thing is fairly simple to set up.

I am posting a step-by-step guide here so that you can dive directly into it. Try it now without wasting any time. Here are the 6 steps you need to take to post to Slack from Flow:

1. Go to “Setup” and “Enable Slack for Salesforce”. Review and agree to the Pilot terms if you want to proceed.

2. Create and assign a permission set to the user who will post on Slack and use the integration. The permission set will have “Connect Salesforce with Slack” system permission activated.

3. Now go over to your Slack Workspace. You can use a free Workspace, but if you have used all your permitted 10 App limit, you will need to remove an App. On the upper left side click on “More”, then “Apps”. On the screen you see in the middle, click on “App Directory”. Find “Sales Cloud for Slack”.

4. Go to the App page. Click on “Add to Slack”. This will take you to a web page that is super confusing. Find “Add Sales Cloud For Slack App”. Click on the link. Give the necessary permissions. (Update: I received feedback that the Sales Cloud Slack app did not work for some folks. If this is your experience try one of the other apps on the same page. I tested the Salesforce Digital HQ app as well, and this app worked for me.)

5. Now go to any public channel on Slack. Click/tap on the channel header where you see the title. Scroll all the way down and get the channel ID as seen below.

6. Go to Salesforce and build a simple Autolaunched Flow with one single element. You will need to add the invocable action “Send Slack Message (Beta)”. Configure it as seen below. Include the Slack Channel ID. Run it. Voila!

Next week, I will continue my preview with the new screen flow functionality.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 05/24/2022.

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Flow Tips Newsletter

May/June 2022 Content Announcement – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

I dedicate this newsletter issue to the announcements for new content coming from me next month (May & June):

  • On 5/31/2022, I will broadcast a live session with my fellow content creator Melody Lwo, a.k.a. Flowsome, on YouTube and LinkedIn. The session has been posted, here on my Salesforce Break YouTube channel and on my LinkedIn profile.
  • I will answer flow questions during our monthly Flow Office hours session with Terry Miller on 6/10/2022. Register for the Flow Office Hours Here.
  • I am the leader of a brand new Trailblazer User Group for Architects. I will host Antoine Cabot, Senior Director of Product Management in Salesforce, on 6/15/2022. Antoine is leading the Orchestrator and Flow for Slack initiative. Register for the Architect session here.
  • I will present in Atlanta at Southeast Dreamin’ a session titled “Flow Trigger Explorer and Orchestrator”. You can find the Dreamin’ session details here and register for the event.

Now let’s get back to reading the Release Notes. Summer 22 will be in all of our Orgs soon.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 05/17/2022.

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The Orchestrator Vision – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

I presented at Texas Dreamin’ two weeks ago. I shared a use case I implemented using the Orchestrator.

The main message of my presentation was to think big when you are working with the Orchestrator.

There are a few reasons for that:

  • The Orchestrator is not free. You should solve a decent-size problem to get a return on your implementation.
  • The tool is complicated. If your use case is not complex, the chances are you will find a way of implementing it with flow and admin tools.
  • The Orchestrator is powerful when you are coordinating tasks going between the silos of the organization.

There were a few observations I shared:

  • The Orchestrator is not an excellent approval process replacement. It does not lock records, and it is harder to implement. Furthermore, Salesforce said the approval process wouldn’t go away.
  • This solution works best when you need to schedule or delay user screen interactions which were not possible before.
  • The tool also can send tasks to users, groups, or queues, which means you will need a broad implementation scope to make the best out of it.

What was the use case I presented?

First, the salesperson wins an opportunity; then, the system checks whether the product in the opportunity line item is in the inventory or not. Next, the automation asks management to approve the order fulfillment and the production request if there is insufficient inventory. Finally, the Orchestrator will create a contract and an order for the opportunity, then a work order to get the item produced if necessary and shipped right after.

Overarching broad processes like these are great for the Orchestrator.

I think it is important to think big before tackling the Orchestrator canvas.

Let’s remember you will be much better off mapping your process before you implement it using this tool. Things will get complicated.

Check out my process map for the use case on top of this page.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 05/10/2022.

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Is There Flow After TDX22? – Salesforce Flow Tips Newsletter

Hello folks,

After a busy week of TDX22 and two Dreamin’ events happening simultaneously, my tired brain is trying to gather and compile all the information. We need to avoid this scheduling conflict in the future.

Let’s dive into the future of automation on the Salesforce platform.

Summer 22 release notes are out. We will know more when the Release Readiness Webinars happen soon. However, we know already that the Orchestrator is GA.

The Orchestrator is a flow of flows, in other words, automation that helps us string flows together. It gives us the superpowers of scheduling and delaying screen interactions and assigning them to users, queues, and groups. Please read J. Steadman’s blog post here for the details.

On top of that, we have a few other posts worth mentioning that were published recently:

What do all these signs tell me:

We are in for a faster ride than ever before. Buckle up.

Recently released content:

Next week, I will continue my preview with the new screen flow functionality.

Enjoy.

P.S. Originally published on 05/03/2022.

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